Harada House — Act now to preserve and create an interpretive center

harada-family-largeIf you are interested in helping preserve the Harada House,  the City has created a separate trust account for the National Historic Landmark Harada House to be used for the Robinson House acquisition/Interpretation Center and the Harada House Capitol Campaign.  The account is tax deductible as called out specifically in the language below.

You can make your check out to:  City of Riverside Trust Acct:  0000721-225468
Please indicate in the memo section:  Founding 20

Send your check to:

Riverside Metropolitan Museum
Attn:  Sarah Suverkrup Mundy, Director
3580 Mission Inn Avenue
Riverside, CA 92501

 

Account Number for City of Riverside Harada/Robinson Trust 0000721-225468

The City of Riverside (Federal Employer Identification Number 95-6000769), as a municipal government, is a political sub-division of the State of California. As such, the City qualifies as a charitable organization as defined by §170(c)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code(IRC). Donations made to the City of Riverside exclusively for public purposes are considered to be tax deductible in accordance with IRC §170(c)(1).

 

Harada House is a National Historic Landmark

Known informally as “The House on Lemon Street” – the house is the only other National Historic Landmark designated in Riverside. The National Historic Landmark Harada House is among the most significant and powerful civil rights landmarks in California. Currently the Harada House does not have a designated group of RMA volunteers as it is only in the early stages of structural stabilization and refurbishment.

The house represents the struggle of one immigrant family to achieve the American promise of freedom, citizenship and a better life for their children. It was purchased in 1915 by Jukichi Harada; the deed was placed in the names of his American-born children at a time when Japanese nationals were prohibited from owning land. Though challenged in their purchase in the courts, the Haradas legally kept their home and raised a family in Riverside. Later, during WWII the family was forced to leave their home when the U.S. government ordered the internment of all people of Japanese descent regardless of their citizenship status. This house and stories within create a powerful symbol of the struggle for civil rights in the United States.

It is additionally worth mentioning in the context of the RMA because of its importance to the history of Riverside and the connection the house and its owners had with Riversiders and other notables of the time. The RMA is taking a leadership role in raising funds for the Harada House restoration through the establishment of the RMA Harada House Stewardship Fund. This will involve active participation of volunteers to raise funds to implement the highest priority preservation projects for the site.

This site and the story of the Harada Family embody local, state, national, and international issues of civil and individual rights, democracy, immigration, assimilation, and citizenship. Preservation of the site, collections, and stories ensures that these pivotal lessons of history will continue to be accessible for all peoples.